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Is Cassandra really visible? Meet Cassibility…

You love Cassandra, but do you really know what’s going on inside your clusters?

Cassandra-CassibilityThis blog post describes how we managed to shed some light on our Cassandra clusters, add visibility and share it with the open source community.

Outbrain has been using Cassandra for several years now. As all companies, we started small, but during the time our usage grew, complexity increased, and we ended up having over 15 Cassandra clusters with hundreds of nodes, spread across multiple data centers.

We are working in the popular micro services model, where each group has its own Cassandra cluster to ensure resources and problems are isolated. But one thing remains common – we need to have good visibility in order to understand what is going on.

We already use Prometheus for metrics collection, Grafana for visualising its data and Pagerduty as our alerting system. However, we still needed to have detailed enough visibility on the Cassandra internals to ensure we could react to any issues encountered before they became a problem and make appropriate and informed performance tunings. I have to admit that when you don’t encounter a lot of problems, you tend to believe that what you have is actually sufficient, but when you suddenly have some nasty production issues, and we had our fair share, it becomes very challenging to debug it efficiently, in realtime, sometimes in the middle of the night.

 

Let’s say, as a simple example, that you realized that the application is behaving slower because the latency in Cassandra increased. You would like to understand what happened, and you start thinking that it can be due to a variety of causes – maybe it’s a system issue, like a hardware problem, or a long GC. Maybe it’s an applicative issue, like an increase in the number of requests due to a new feature or an application bug, and if so you would like to point the developer to a specific scenario which caused it. If so it would be good if you could tell him that this is happening in a specific keyspace or column family. In this case, if you’re also using row cache for example, you would wonder if maybe the application is not using the cache well enough, for example the new feature is using a new table which is not in the cache, so the hit rate will be low. And Maybe it’s not related to any of the above and it is actually happening due to a repair or read repair process, or massive amount of compactions that accumulated.  It would be great if you could see all of this in just a few dashboards, where all you had to do in order to dig into these speculation of your could be done in just a few clicks, right? Well, that’s what Cassibility gives you.

Take a look at the following screenshots, and see how you can see an overview of the situation and pinpoint the latency issue to number of requests or connections change, then quickly move to a system dashboard to isolate the loaded resource:

* Please note, the dashboards don’t correspond to the specific problem described, this is just an example of the different graphs

Overview_DocsOnline_1

System_DocsOnline

Then if you’d like to see if it’s related to specific column families, to cache or to repairs, there are dedicated dashboards for this as well

ColumnFamily_DocsOnline

Cache_DocsOnline

Entropy_DocsOnline

Here is the story of how we created Cassibility.

We decided to invest time in creating better and deeper visibility, and had some interesting iterations in this project.

At first, we tried to look for an open-source package that we could use, but as surprising as it may be, even with the wide usage of Cassandra around the world, we couldn’t find one that was sufficient and detailed enough for our requirements. So we started thinking how to do it ourselves.

 

Iteration I

We began to dig into what Cassandra can show us. We found out that Cassandra itself exposes quite a lot of metrics, could reach dozens of thousands of metrics per node, and they can be captured easily via JMX. Since we were already using the Prometheus JMX exporter (https://github.com/prometheus/jmx_exporter) in our Prometheus implementation, it seemed like the right choice to use it and easy enough to accomplish.

Initially we thought we should just write a script that exposes all of our metrics and automatically create JSON files that represent each metric in a graph. We exposed additional dimensions for each metric in order to specify the name of the cluster, the data center and some other information that we could use to monitor our Cassandra nodes more accurately. We also thought of automatically adding Grafana templates to all the graphs, from which one could choose and filter which cluster he wants to see, which datacenter, which Keyspace or Column Family / Table and even how to see the result (as a sum, average, etc.).

This sounded very good in theory, but after thinking about it a bit more, such abstraction was very hard to create. For instance there are some metrics that are counters, (e.g number of requests) and some that are gauge (e.g latency percentile). This means that with counters you may want to calculate the rate on top of the metric itself, like when you would want to take the number of requests and use it to calculate  a throughput. With a gauge you don’t need to do anything on top of the metric.    

Another example is how you would like to see the results when looking at the whole cluster. There are some metrics, which we would like to see in the node resolution and some in the datacenter or cluster resolution. If we take the throughput, it will be interesting to see what is the overall load on the cluster, so you can sum up the throughput of all nodes to see that. The same calculation is interesting at the keyspace or column family level. But if you look at latency, and you look at a specific percentile, then summing, averaging or finding maximum across all nodes actually has no meaning. Think about what it means if you take the number that represents the request latency which 99% of the requests on a specific node are lower than, and then do the maximum over all nodes in the cluster. You don’t really get the 99’th percentile of latency over the whole cluster, you get a lot of points, each representing the value of the node with the highest 99’th percentile latency in every moment. There is not much you can do with this information.

There are lot of different examples of this problem with other metrics but I will skip them as they require a more in depth explanation.

 

The next issue was how to arrange the dashboards. This is also something that is hard to do automatically. We thought to just take the structure of the Mbeans, and arrange dashboards accordingly, but this is also not so good. The best example is, of course, that anyone would like to see an overview dashboard that contains different pieces from different Mbeans, or a view of the load on your system resources, but there are many other examples.

 

Iteration II

We realized that we need to better understand every metric in order to create a clear dashboard suite, that will be structured in a way that is intuitive to use while debugging problems.

When reviewing the various sources of documentation on the many metrics, we found that although there was some documentation out there, it was often basic and incomplete – typically lacking important detail such as the units in which the metric is calculated, or is written in a way that doesn’t explain much on top of the metric name itself. For example, there is an Mbean called ClientRequest, which includes different metrics on the external requests sent to Cassandra’s coordinator nodes. It contains metrics about latency and throughput. On the Cassandra Wiki page the description is as follows:

      Latency : Latency statistics.

TotalLatency : Total latency in micro seconds

That doesn’t say much. Which statistics exactly? What does the total mean in comparison to  just latency? The throughput, by the way, is actually an attribute called counter within the latency MBean of a certain scope (Read, Write, etc.), but there are no details about this in the documentation and it’s not that intuitive to understand. I’m not saying you can’t get to it with some digging and common sense, but it certainly takes time when you’re starting.

Since we couldn’t find one place with good and full set of documentation we started digging ourselves, comparing values to see if they made sense and used a consultant named Johnny Miller from digitalis.io who has worked a lot with Cassandra and was very familiar with its internals and  metrics.

We improved our overall understanding at the same time as building and structuring the dashboards and graphs.

Before we actually started, we figured out two things:

  1. What we are doing must be something that many other companies working with Cassandra need, so our project just might as well be an open-source one, and help others too.
  2. There were a lot of different sections inside Cassandra, from overview to cache, entropy, keyspace/column family granularities and more, each of which we may want to look at separately in case we get some clues that something may be going on there. So each such section could actually be represented as a dashboard, and could be worked on in parallel.

We dedicated the first day to focus on classifying the features into logical groupings with a common theme and deciding what information was required in each one.

Once we had defined that, we then started to think about the best and fastest way to implement the project and decided to have a 1 day Hackathon in Outbrain. Many people from our Operations and R&D teams joined this effort, and since we could parallelize the work to at most 10 people, that’s the number of people who participated in the end.

This day focused both on creating the dashboards as well as finding solutions to all places where we used Outbrain specific tools to gather information (for example, we use Consul for service discovery and are able to pull information from it). We ended the day with having produced 10 dashboards,with some documentation, and we were extremely happy with the result.

 

Iteration III

 

To be sure that we are actually releasing something that is usable, intuitive to use and clear, we wanted to review the dashboards, documentation and installation process. During this process, like most of us engineers know, we found out that the remaining 20% will take quite a bit to complete.

Since in the Hackathon people with different knowledge of Cassandra participated, some of the graphs were not completely accurate. Additional work was therefore needed to work out exactly which graphs should go together and what level of detail is actually helpful to look at while debugging, how the graphs will look when there are a lot of nodes, column families/tables and check various other edge cases. We spent several hours a week over the next few weeks on different days to finalize it.

We are already using Cassibility in our own production environment, and it has already helped us to expose anomalies, debug problems quickly and optimize performance.

I think that there is a big difference between having some visibility and some graphs and having a full, well organized and understandable list of dashboards that gives you the right views at the right granularity, with clear documentation. The latter is what will really save you time and effort and even help people that are relatively new to Cassandra to understand it better.

I invite you to take a look, download and easily start using Cassibility:   https://github.com/outbrain/Cassibility . We will be happy to hear your feedback!

Angular DRY mocking – Leonardo

leonardo-logo

This post was written by Sagiv Frenkel.

As developers one of the first and most basic things we learn is “Don’t repeat yourself!”.
That means trying to avoid writing the same code twice – in other words, no copy paste!
While we still sin with the occasional copy paste, it’s something we’re mindful of and is easy to notice. We just have to remember to refactor later on.

But do we treat our mocking the same ?

Lets look at a typical development flow

1) Create your UI/UX, services and controller.
2) Create your server API calls.
3) Test your application, manually/automated with self generated data in different scenarios.

What’s wrong with this approach?

We are’nt repeating code, but we are repeating work

1) Documenting – there’s no good way to tell which user/data to use for which scenario.
2) Running – you need to log in/out to change users or manually change code to fit changes.
3) Testing – error scenarios, edge cases, and request delays/throttling are very hard. Using override scripts or using comments to switch data are the only tools at our disposal.

Can we do better?

Introducing Leonardo

Leonardo is an open sourced AngularJS module created by Outbrain. It can be installed from npm or Bower, and easily integrates into existing AngularJS applications (more details on Leonardo’s GitHub repo)


Leonardo has a fancy UI where you can easily toggle different states/scenarios.

It enables you to:

1) Centralize your mocking and scenario configuration.
2) Persist the configuration into an external file.
3) Create manual QA or automated test

We use Leonardo extensively with protractor. More on this in another post.

Want to get started with Leonardo?

Check this Example to see how you can move from a regular image gallery to a mocked one.

How does Leonardo work?

Leonardo has two important concepts – states and scenarios.

state

We add states to declare what and how to mock.
There are two types:

Ajax States – This it what we will typically use. We declare the url and verb we wish to mock and what response data we wish to return – including a delay and a status.
[javascript][gist id=2eef31571454c5f6441c file=add-ajax-state.js][/javascript]

Non Ajax States – This requires more work on the part of the developers. Basically, this allows you to declare a state and its underlying data, (not mandatory) and you can later check if it’s on or off.
[javascript][gist id=2eef31571454c5f6441c file=add-non-ajax-state.js][/javascript]

You can query Leonardo for the value of a certain state.
[javascript][gist id=2eef31571454c5f6441c file=query-state.js][/javascript]

Leonardo triggers an event whenever a state changes.
[javascript][gist id=2eef31571454c5f6441c file=event-handler.js][/javascript]

Scenarios:

Scenarios simply enable you to set a specific set of states as active.
[javascript][gist id=2eef31571454c5f6441c file=add-scenario.js][/javascript]

Note:

– We currently only support Angular application. That is what we initially developed on, and was easy to implements. If the tool gains traction and popularity, it should be easy to migrate to a more vanilla approach.

Use Leonardo to start mocking http or anything you like! We’d love to get your feedback!

Announcing orchestrator-agent

Announcing orchestrator-agent

This post was written by Shlomi Noach

orchestrator-agent is a side-kick, complementary project of orchestrator, implementing a daemon service on one’s MySQL hosts which communicates with and accepts commands from orchestrator, built with the original purpose of providing an automated solution for provisioning new or corrupted slaves.

It was built by Outbrain, with Outbrain’s specific use case in mind. While we release it as open source, only a small part of its functionality will appeal to the public (this is why it’s not strictly part of the orchestrator project, which is a general purpose, wide-audience solution). Nevertheless, it is a simple implementation of a daemon, such that can be easily extended by the community. The project is open for pull-requests!

A quick breakdown of orchestrator-agent is as follows:

  • Executes as a daemon on linux hosts
  • Interacts and invokes OS commands (via bash)
  • Does not directly interact with a MySQL server running on that host (does not connect via mysql credentials)
  • Expects a single MySQL service on host
  • Can control the MySQL service (e.g. stop, start)
  • Is familiar with LVM layer on host
  • Can take LVM snapshots, mount snapshots, remove snapshots
  • Is familiar with the MySQL data directory, disk usage, file system
  • Can send snapshot data from a mounted snapshot on a running MySQL host
  • Can prepare data directory and receive snapshot data from another host
  • Recognizes local/remote datacenters
  • Controlled by orchestrator, two orchestrator-agents implement an automated and audited solution for seeding a new/corrupted MySQL host based on a running server.

Read more >

Announcing Aletheia – A streaming data delivery framework

This post was written by Stas Levin

Outbrain is proud to announce Aletheia, our solution for a uniform data delivery and flow monitoring across data producing and consuming subsystems. At Outbrain we have great amounts of data being constantly moved and processed by various real time and batch oriented mechanisms. To allow fast recovery and high SLA, we need to be able to detect problems in our data crunching mechanisms as fast as we can, preferably at near real time. The later problems are detected, the harder it is to investigate them (and thus fix them), and chances of business impact grow rapidly.

To address these issues, we’ve built Aletheia, a framework providing a uniform way to deliver and consume data, with built in monitoring capabilities allowing both producing and consuming sides to report statistics, which can be used to monitor the pipeline state in a timely fashion.

Read more >

The power of promises for file downloading

In this blog post I will be implementing a file download with a progress indicator using cookies, AngularJS and the promises.

Promises are a powerful concept with a number of advantages, in the following implementation pay attention to these points (your more then welcome to comment):

  1. Clarity and readability of code
  2. Error handling
  3. Separation of concerns

I thought of showing the same implementation without promises, but I think anyone who has tried to handle more than one callback and handle the error cases properly will easily see the difference.

The Module

A download button that changes it’s text with set intervals.
At the end it should be in a success state or an error state.
To complicate things a little and show the power of promises I added another step called “validateBeforeDownload”, this step will call the server to validate the download and fail it if necessary.
[xyz-ihs snippet=”fileDownload”]

Downloading a file

The standard way of downloading a file is with a simple “a” tag with an href.
In order to do be able to add the “validateBeforeDownload” step and avoid passing “dom” to a service – I am using an Iframe which a service creates and destroys. This will trigger the download and if the server headers are appropriate the download will begin.

Service Code

[javascript][gist id=01e228e3923556afaea8 file=iframeDownload.js][/javascript]

Adding in the progress

Easier said then done! Downloading a file can’t be done with an simple ajax call, so you can’t tell when the download is complete.
The solution I’m using is setting a cookie, let’s call it “download_file” with a timer that checks for a cookie every 500ms.

  • While the cookie exists the loading state is preserved.
  • Once the request completes, the server deletes the cookie and the timer is stopped.

This isn’t the best solution but is simple and doesn’t require sockets or external plugins.

Service Code

[javascript][gist id=01e228e3923556afaea8 file=manageIframeProgress.js][/javascript]

Java Server

Just to get the full stack of implementation here is the code for handling the response data and the clearing of the cookie.
[java][gist id=01e228e3923556afaea8 file=server.java][/java]

Wrapping everything together with promises

Pay attention to the comments in the code, some of the code is there to simulate the server requests and response and are only there for the full picture.

HTML

Each visual state of the button is determined by it’s text (scope.downloadExcelText).
[javascript][gist id=01e228e3923556afaea8 file=button.html][/javascript]

Service

Notice $timeout mocks an asynchronous call and it’s response to a server.
this would normally be done with $http.
[javascript][gist id=01e228e3923556afaea8 file=service.js][/javascript]

Controller

This is were our hard work pays off and promises start to shine.

Lets step into the promise mechanism –
Prepending the “downloadService.validateBeforeDownload” to the “downloadService.downloadExcel” with the “then” method creates a third promise which shares callbacks for: success, failure and notifications (for the progress).
There is also a finally callback attached to this promise that we use for sharing code between the success and failure.
But the really nice thing here is it also enables handling errors just from the “validateBeforeDownload”, and bubbling them up if needed with $q.reject or by simply throwing the error.

Pay attention that each step towards completion of the promise seems to be handled in an async manner and the actual asynchronicity is handled by the promise mechanism and the service. Magic!
[javascript][gist id=01e228e3923556afaea8 file=controller.js][/javascript]

Introducing Orchestrator: manage and visualize your MySQL replication topologies and get home for dinner

Introducing Orchestrator: manage and visualize your MySQL replication topologies and get home for dinner

 

This post was written by Shlomi Noach

We’re happy to announce the availability of Outbrain‘s Orchestrator: MySQL replication management & visualization tool.

orchestrator-simple

  • Orchestrator reads your replication topologies (give it one server – be it master or slave – in each topology, and it will reveal the rest).
  • It keeps a state of this topology.
  • It can continuously poll your servers to get an up to date topology map.
  • It visualizes the topology in a clear and slick D3 tree.
  • It allows you to modify your topology; move slaves around. You can use the command line variation, the JSON API, or you can use the web interface.

Quick links: Orchestrator Manual, FAQ, Downloads

Nothing like nice screenshots

To move slaves around the topology (repoint a slave to a different master) through orchestrator‘s web interface, we use Drag and Drop,

just

orchestrator-simple-drag

like

orchestrator-simple-drag-hover

that.

orchestrator-simple-dropped

Safety

Orchestrator keeps you safe. It does so by:

  • Correctly calculating the binary log files & positions (aka coordinates) of the slave you’re moving, its current master, its new master; it properly stops, starts and stalls your replication till everything is in sync.
  • Helping you to avoid shooting yourself in the leg. It will not allow moving a slave that uses STATEMENT based replication under a ROW based replication server. Or a 5.5 under a 5.6. Or anything under a server that doesn’t have binary logs. Or log_slave_updates. Or if one of the servers involed lags too much. Or more…

Visualization

It also points out a few problems, visually. While it is not – and will not be – a monitoring tool, it requires some replication status info for its own purposes. Too much lag? Replication not working? Server cannot be accessed? Server under maintenance? This all shows up in your topology. We use it a lot to get a holistic view over our current replication topologies status.

State

Orchestrator keeps the state of your topologies. Unlike other tools that will drill down from the master and just pick up on whatever’s connected right now, orchestrator remembers what used to be connected, too. If a slave is not replicating at this very moment, that does not mean it’s not part of the topology. Same for a MySQL service that has been temporarily stopped. And this includes all their slaves, if any. Until told otherwise (or until too much time passes and a server is assumed dead), orchestrator keeps the map intact.

Maintenance

Orchestrator supports a maintenance-mode state; it’s a flag saying “this server is in maintenance mode right now”. But this flag includes an owner and a reason for audit purposes. And while a server is under maintenance, orchestrator will disallow replication topology changes that include this server.

Audit

Operations performed via orchestrator are audited (well, almost all). You have a complete history on what slave has been moved from where to where; what server has been taken under maintenance and when, etc.

Automation

The most important thing is of course automating error-prone human sequences of actions. Repointing slaves is a mess (when you don’t have GTIDs). Automation saves time and greatly reduces the possibility that something goes wrong (of course never eliminates). We happen to use orchestrator at Outbrain on production, and twice in the past month had major events where orchestrator saved us many hours and worry.

Support

Orchestrator supports “standard” replication: log file:pos kind of replication. Non GTID, non-parallel. Good (?) old replication.

Why not GTID? We’re using MySQL 5.5. We’ve had issues while evaluating 5.6; and besides, migrating to GTID is a mess (several solutions or proposed solutions seem to exist). At this time the majority of MySQL users seem to run 5.5, and a minority of those running 5.6 uses GTID (this is according to an unofficial “raise your hands” survey during last Percona Live event). “Standard” replication still applies to the majority of users. Support for GTID may be added in the future.

Read the FAQ for further questions on supported replication technologies.

How do you like it?

Orchestrator can run as a command line tool (no need for Web). It can server HTTP JSON API (no need for visualization) or it can server as HTTP web interface (no need to use command line options). Have it your way.

The technology stack

Orchestrator is written in Go, with Martini as web framework; MySQL as backend database; D3, jQuery & bootstrap for frontend.

License

Orchestrator is released as open source under the Apache 2.0 license and is available at: https://github.com/outbrain/orchestrator

Documentation

Read the Manual

Download

Get the bundled binary+web files tarball, RPM or DEB packages. Or just clone the project. It’s free.

 

Introducing Propagator: multi-everything deployment made easy

Introducing Propagator: multi-everything deployment made easy

This post was written by Shlomi Noach.

Outbrain is happy to release its own Propagator as open source. Propagator is a schema & data deployment tool which makes it easy to deploy, review, audit & fix deployments to your database servers.

What does multi-everything mean? It is:

  • Multi-server: push your schema & data changes to multiple instances in parallel
  • Multi-role: different servers have different schemas
  • Multi-environment: recognizes the differences between development, QA, build & production servers
  • Multi-technology: supports MySQL, Hive (Cassandra on the TODO list)
  • Multi-user: allows users authenticated and audited access
  • Multi-planetary: TODO

With dozens of database servers in our company (and these are master database servers), from development machines to testing machines, through build machines to production servers, and with a growing team of over 70 engineers, we faced the growing problem of controlling our database schema evolution. Controlling creation of tables, columns, keys, foreign keys; controlling creation of data that must be consistent across all servers became an infeasible task. Some changes were lost; some servers forgotten along the way, and inconsistencies blocked our development & deployments again and again. Read more >

Finding a needle in a Storm-stack


Using Storm for real time distributed computations has become a widely adopted approach, and today one can easily find more than a few posts on Storm’s architecture, internals, and what have you (e.g., Storm wiki, Understanding the parallelism of a storm topology, Understanding storm internal message buffers, etc).

So you read all these posts and and got yourself a running Storm cluster. You even wrote a topology that does something you need, and managed to get it deployed. “How cool is this?”, you think to yourself. “Extremely cool”, you reply to yourself sipping the morning coffee. The next step would probably be writing some sort of a validation procedure, to make sure your distributed Storm computation does what you think it does, and does it well. Here at Outbrain we have these validation processes running hourly, making sure our realtime layer data is consistent with our batch layer data – which we consider to be the source of truth.

It was when the validation of a newly written computation started failing, that we embarked on a great journey to the land of “How does one go about debugging a distributed Storm computation?”, true story. The validation process was reporting intermittent inconsistencies when, intermittent being the operative word here, since it was not like the new topology was completely and utterly messed up, rather, it was failing to produce correct results for some of the input, all the time (by correct results I mean such that match our source of truth).

Read more >

UPDATE #2: Outbrain Security Breach

Earlier today, Outbrain was the victim of a hacking attack by the Syrian Electronic Army. Below is a description of how the attack unfolded to help others protect against similar attempts. Updates will continue to be posted to this blog.

On the evening of August 14th, a phishing email was sent to all employees at Outbrain purporting to be from Outbrain’s CEO. It led to a page asking Outbrain employees to input their credentials to see the information. Once an employee had revealed their information, the hackers were able to infiltrate our email systems and identify other credentials for accessing some of our internal systems.

At 10:23am EST SEA took responsibility for hack of CNN.com, changing a setting through Outbrain’s admin console to label Outbrain recommendations as “Hacked by SEA.

At 10:34am Outbrain internal staff became aware of the breach.

By 10:40am Outbrain network operations began investigating and decided to shut down all serving systems, degrade gracefully and block all external access to the system.

By 11:03am Outbrain finished turning off its service from all sites where we operate.

We are continuing to review all systems before re-initiating service.

UPDATE #1: Outbrain Security Breach

We are aware that Outbrain was hacked earlier today and we took down service as soon as it was apparent.  The breach now seems to be secured and the hackers blocked out, but we are keeping the service down for a little longer until we can be sure it’s safe to turn it back on securely. Please stayed tuned here or to our Twitter feed for updates.