Category: Research

Hadoop Research Journey from Bare Metal to Google Cloud – Episode 3

Previously on our second episode of the trilogy  “Hadoop Research Journey from bare metal to Google Cloud – Episode 2”, we covered the POC we had.

In this episode we will focus on the migration itself, building a POC environment is all nice and easy, however migrating 2 PB (the raw part out of 6 PB which include the replication) of data turned to be a new challenge. But before we jump into technical issues, lets start with the methodology.

The big migration

We learned from our past experience that in order for such a project to be successful, like in many other cases, it is all about the people – you need to be minded to the users and make sure you have their buy-in.

On top of that, we wanted to complete the migration within 4 months, as we had a renewal of our datacenter space coming up, and we wanted to gain from the space reduction as result of the migration.

Taking those two considerations in mind, we decided that we will have the same technologies which are Hadoop and Hive on the cloud environment, and only after the migration is done we would look into leveraging new technologies available on GCP.

Now after the decision was made we started to plan the migration of the research cluster to GCP, looking into different aspects as:

  • Build the network topology (VPN, VPC etc.)
  • Copy the historical data
  • Create the data schema (Hive)
  • Enable the runtime data delivery
  • Integrate our internal systems (monitoring, alerts, provision etc.)
  • Migrate the workflows
  • Reap the bare metal cluster (with all its supporting systems)

All in the purpose of productizing the solution and making it production grade, based on our standards. We made a special effort to leverage the same management and configuration control tools we use in our internal datacenters (such as Chef, Prometheus etc.) – so we would treat this environment as yet just another datacenter.

Copying the data

Sound like a straightforward activity – you need to copy your data from location A to location B.

Well, turns out that when you need to copy 2 PB of data, while the system is still active in production, there are some challenges involved.

The first restriction we had, was that the copy of data will not impact the usage of the cluster – as the research work still need to be performed.

Second, once data is copied, we also need to have data validation.

 

Starting with data copy

  • Option 1 – Copy the data using Google Transfer Appliance

Google can ship their transfer appliance (based on the location of your datacenter), that you would attach to the Hadoop Cluster and be used to copy the data. Ship it back to Google and download the data from the appliance to GCS.

Unfortunately, from the capacity perspective we would need to have several iterations of this process in order to copy all the data, and on top of that the Cloudera community version we were using was so old – it was not supported.

  • Option 2 – Copy the data over the network

When taking that path, the main restriction is that the network is used for both the production environment (serving) and for the copy, and we could not allow the copy to create network congestion on the lines.

However, if we restrict the copy process, the time it would take to copy all the data will be too long and we will not be able to meet our timelines.

Setup the network

As part of our network infrastructure, per datacenter we have 2 ISPs, each with 2 x 10G lines for backup and redundancy.

We decided to leverage those backup lines and build a tunnel on those lines, to be dedicated only to the Hadoop data copy. This enabled us to copy the data in relatively short time on one hand, and assure that it will not impact our production traffic as it was contained to specific lines.

Once the network was ready we started to copy the data to the GCS.

As you may remember from previous episodes, our cluster was set up over 6 years ago, and as such acquired a lot of tech debt around it, also in the data kept in it. We decided to take advantage of the situation and leverage the migration also to do some data and workload cleanup.

We invested time in mapping what data we need and what data can be cleared, although it didn’t significantly reduce the data size we managed to delete 80% of the tables, we also managed to delete 80% of the workload.

Data validation

As we migrated the data, we had to have data validation, making sure there are no corruptions / missing data.

More challenges on the data validation aspects to take into consideration –

  • The migrated cluster is a live cluster – so new data keeps been added to it and old data deleted
  • With our internal Hadoop cluster, all tables are stored as files while on GCS they are stored as objects.

It was clear that we need to automate the process of data validation and build dashboards to help us monitor our progress.

We ended up implementing a process that creates two catalogs, one for the bare metal internal Hadoop cluster and one for the GCP environment, comparing those catalogs and alerting us to any differences.

This dashboard shows per table the files difference between the bare metal cluster and the cloud

 

In parallel to the data migration, we worked on building the Hadoop ecosystem on GCP, including the tables schemas with their partitions in Hive, our runtime data delivery systems adding new data to the GCP environment in parallel to the internal bare metal Hadoop cluster, our monitoring systems, data retention systems etc.

The new environment on GCP was finally ready and we were ready to migrate the workloads. Initially, we duplicated jobs to run in parallel on both clusters, making sure we complete validation and will not impact production work.

After a month of validation, parallel work and required adjustments we were able to decommission the in-house Research Cluster.

What we achieved in this journey

  • Upgraded the technology
  • Improve the utilization and gain the required elasticity we wanted
  • Reduced the total cost
  • Introduced new GCP tools and technologies

Epilogue

This amazing journey lasted for almost 6 months of focused work. As planned the first step was to use the same technologies that we had in the bare metal cluster but once we finished the migration to GCP we can now start planning how to further take advantage of the new opportunities that arise from leveraging GCP technologies and tools.

Hadoop Research Journey from Bare Metal to Google Cloud – Episode 2

Previously on our first episode of the trilogy  “Hadoop Research Journey from bare metal to Google Cloud – Episode 1”, we covered our challenges.

In this episode, I am looking to focus on the POC that we did in order to decide whether we should rebuild the Research cluster in-house or migrate it to the cloud.

The POC

As we had many open questions around migration to the cloud, we decided to do a learning POC, focusing on 3 main questions:

  1. Understand the learning curve that will be required from the users
  2. Compatibility with our in-house Online Hadoop clusters
  3. Estimate cost for running the Research cluster in the Cloud

However, before jumping into the water of the POC, we had some preliminary work to be done.

Mapping workloads

As the Research cluster was running for over 6 years already, there were many different use cases running on it. Some of which are well known and familiar to users, but some are old tech debts which no one knew if needed or not, and what is their value.

We started with mapping all the flows and use cases running on the cluster, mapped users and assigned owners to the different workflows.

We also created distinction between ad-hoc queries and batch processing.

Mapping technologies

We mapped all the technologies we need to support on the Research cluster in order to assure full compatibility with our Online clusters and in-house environment.

After collecting all the required information regarding the use cases and mapping the technologies we selected representative workflows and users to participate in the POC and take active part in it, collecting their feedback regarding the learning curve and ease of use. This approach will also serve us well later on, if we decide to move forward with the migration, having in house ambassadors.

Once we mapped all our needs, it was also easier to get from the different cloud vendors high level cost estimation, to give us a general indication if it makes sense for us to continue and invest time and resources in doing the POC.

 

We wanted to complete the POC within 1 month, so on one hand it will run long enough to cover all types of jobs, but on the other hand it will not be prolonged.

For the POC environment we built Hadoop cluster, based on standard technologies.

We decided not to leverage at this point special proprietary vendor technologies, as we wanted to reduce the learning curve and were careful not to get into a vendor lock-in.

 

In addition, we decided to start the POC only with one vendor, and not to run it on multiple cloud vendors.

The reason behind it was our mindfulness to our internal resources and time constraints.

We did theoretical evaluation of technology roadmap and cost for several Cloud vendors, and choose to go with GCP option, looking to also leverage BigQuery in the future (once all our data will be migrated).

The execution

Once we decided on the vendor, technologies and use cases we were good to go.

For the purpose of the POC we migrated 500TB of our data, build the Hadoop cluster based on Data Proc, and build the required endpoint machines.

Needless to say, that already in this stage we had to create the network infrastructure to support the secure work of the hybrid environment between GCP and our internal datacenters.

Now that everything was ready we started the actual POC from the users perspective. For a period of one month the participate users will perform their use cases twice. Once on the in-house Research cluster (the production environment), and second time on the Research cluster build on GCP (the POC environment). The users were required to record their experience, which was measured according to the flowing criteria:

  • Compatibility (did the test run seamlessly, any modifications to code and queries required, etc.)
  • Performance (execution time, amount of resources used)
  • Ease of use

During the month of the POC we worked closely with the users, gathered their overall experience and results.

In addition, we documented the compute power needed to execute those jobs, which enabled us to do better cost estimation for how much it would cost to run the full Research Cluster on the cloud.

The POC was successful

The users had a good experience, and our cost analysis proved that with leveraging the cloud elasticity, which in this scenario was very significant, the cloud option would be ROI positive compared with the investment we would need to do building the environment internally. (without getting into the exact numbers – over 40% cheaper, which is a nice incentive!)

With that we started our last phase – the actual migration, which is the focus of our last episode in “Hadoop Research Journey from Bare Metal to Google Cloud – Episode 3”. Stay tuned!

Hadoop Research Journey from Bare Metal to Google Cloud – Episode 1

Outbrain is the world’s leading discovery platform, serving over 250 billion personal recommendations per month. In order to provide premium recommendations at such a scale, we leverage capabilities in analyzing a large amount of data. We use a variety of data stores and technologies such as MySql, Cassandra, Elasticsearch, and Vertica, however in this post trilogy (all things can be split to 3…) I would like to focus on our Hadoop eco-system and our journey from pure bare metal into a hybrid cloud solution.

Hadoop Research Journey from Bare Metal to Google Cloud

The bare metal period

In a nutshell, we keep two flavors of Hadoop clusters:

  • Online clusters, used for online serving activities. Those clusters are relatively small (2 PB of data per cluster) and are kept in our datacenters on bare metal clusters, as part of our serving infrastructure.
  • Research cluster, surprisingly, used mainly for research and offline activities. This cluster keeps large amount of data (6 PB), and by nature the workload on this cluster is elastic.

Most of the time it was not utilized, but there were times of peaks when there was a need to query huge amount of data.

History lesson

Before we move forward in our tale, it may be worthwhile to spend a few words about the history.

We first started to use the Hadoop technology at Outbrain over 6 years ago – starting as a technical small experiment. As our business rapidly grow, so did the data, and the clusters were adjusted in size, however a tech debt had been built up around it. We continued to grow the clusters, based on scale out methodology, and after some time, found ourselves with clusters running old Hadoop version, not being able to support new technologies, build from hundreds of servers, some of which are very old.

We decided we need to stop being fire fighters, and to get super proactive about the issue. We first took care of the Online clusters, and migrated them to a new in-house bare metal solution (you can read more about on this in the Migrating Elephants post on Outbrain Tech Blog site)

Now it was time to move forward and deal with our Research cluster.

Research cluster starting point

Our starting point for the Research cluster was a cluster build out of 500 servers, holding about 6 PB of data, running CDH4 community version.

As mentioned before, the workload on this cluster is elastic – at times, requires a lot of compute power and most of the time fairly under utilized (see graph below).

Research cluster starting point

This graph shows the CPU utilization for 2 weeks, as it seen the usage is not constant, most of the time is barely used, with some periodic peaks

 

The cluster was unable to support new technologies (such as SPARK and ORC), which were already in use with the Online clusters, reducing our ability to use it for real research.

On top of that, some of the servers in this cluster were becoming very old, and as we grow the cluster on the fly, its storage:CPU:RAM ratio was suboptimal, causing us to waste expensive foot print in our datacenter.  

On top of all of the above, it caused so much frustration to the team!

We mapped our options moving forward:

  1. Do in-place upgrade to the Research cluster software
  2. Rebuild the research cluster from scratch on bare metal in our datacenters (similar to the project we did with the Online clusters)
  3. Leverage cloud technologies and migrate the research cluster to the Cloud.

The dilemma

Option #1 was dropped immediately since it answered only a fraction of our frustration at best. It did not address the old hardware issues, and it did not address our concerned regarding non optimal storage:CPU:RAM ratios – which we understood would only get worse when we come to use RAM intensive technologies such as SPARK.   

We had a dilemma between option #2 and option #3, both viable options with pros and cons.  

Building the Research cluster in house was a project we were very familiar with (we just finished our Online clusters migration), our users were very familiar with the technology, so no learning curve on this front. On the other hand, it required a big financial investment, and we were unable to leverage the elasticity to the extent we wanted.

Migrating to the cloud answered our elasticity needs, however presented a non-predictable cost model (something very important to the finance guys), and had many unknowns as it was new for us, and for the users that would need to work with the environment. It was clear that learning and education will be needed, but it was not clear as to how steep this learning curve would be.   

On top of that, we knew that we must have full compatibility between the Research cluster and the Online cluster, but it was hard for us to estimate the effort required to get there, and the number of processes that require data transition between the clusters.  

 

So, what do we do when we don’t know which option is better?

We study and experiment! And this is how we entered the 2nd period – the POC.

You are invited to read about the POC we did and how we did it on our next episode of “Hadoop Research Journey from Bare Metal to Google Cloud – Episode 2”.

Taking the pain out of Data Science – part 2

This is post #2 in series of 3 posts covering our machine learning framework. We recommend to read post #1 first to understand the challenges we face and get an overview of our solution.
This part will focus on how we handle our data and make it more accessible – using an on-going data collection process.

Data Collection

The first part of any data science task, is getting a good dataset to work with. We have a lot of data, but preparing the datasets can be a very hard work – you really have to “get your hands dirty” to get the data from all the sources and tables and convert them into an easy to use dataset.

Data Collection

Challenges:

What are the main challenges in creating a good dataset to use?

  • Many output tables – tables that store requests for recommendations, served recommendations, user clicks, profiles for the users and documents and more.
  • Number of data stores – these tables are stored on a number of sources, due to their different nature. Some are Hive tables, some data is stored on MySQL, and on Cassandra as well.
  • Long queries – some of these tables are very big. Querying them, especially for a long date range, can take a while.
  • Irrelevant data – we rarely want data from our entire traffic. Usually we only want some portion of it which is relevant for the current modeling task.

Silos and partitioning:

In addition to these challenges, there are other advantages to a good data collection process.

We want to have the ability to train models on different silos – different population groups, that may behave differently and require different models.

To enable achieving this easily, we add a number of columns and partitions to our output aggregation tables – such as platform, country, language and more.

This allows us to quickly try out our models on different groups.

Output:

We decided to split our output into 2 main parts:

First, a dataset for building models: It will contain only the served recommendations we want (from specific variants of the traffic), and it should contain all of the clicked recommendations plus a sample of the non clicks, in order to have a balanced dataset for learning.

Second, a dataset that will be used for simulation of the business metrics.

Our recommendations are served in widgets, showing a small batch of recommendations.
For this use case, we take only recommendations from widgets that received at least one click.

With this dataset, we can apply our model only on these clicked widgets, and see how well we graded the clicked recommendation compared to the other non clicked recommendations.

Output

The solution – Automatic Spark job

Our solution to solve all these challenges was to create an automatic data collection job.

The job runs hourly, triggered by our ETL engine.
An hourly Apache Spark job aggregates an hourly dataset, with the relevant data; creates the needed partitions; and creates the two outputs described above.

Using Spark was very convenient for this use case. It allowed us to create a readable flow, that queries different input sources, and holds in memory data that is common for both tables before writing the final output to Hive.

 

A quick note on how we monitor our Spark jobs:

It is somewhat of a challenge to understand how a Spark job behaves, other the basic error messages and checking the job’s output.

To make the job’s progress and status more visible, we send metrics from the job’s driver, using HTTP, to our monitoring server, which aggregates them.

This allows us to create simple to use dashboards and understand with ease what is going on.

In addition we send out textual logs to our monitoring server, that indexes them to an ElasticSearch cluster. We can then view the logs with ease using Kibana.

Below is a dashboard example for a demo job, collecting a portion of our data.

dashboard example for a demo job

Stay tuned for our 3rd and last part of this blog post series where we will cover our Spark-based machine learning framework, that allows us to be highly agile with our research tasks, and dynamic as well as robust in pushing our models to production.

Taking the pain out of Data Science – RecSys machine learning framework over Spark, Part 1

Overview

The role of a Data Scientist, or Machine Learning engineer, is becoming more and more valuable in the tech industry. It is the fast growing job in the U.S. according to a LinkedIn study, and was recently ranked as the best job in America by Glassdoor.

However, the life of a Data Scientist isn’t easy – the job requires good Math and Statistics knowledge, programming background and experience, and “hacking” skills, in order to get things done. This is especially true when handling huge amounts of data of different types.

We, at the personalization team at Outbrain, decided to try and take out the pain of data science, and make our life easier to allow us to perform effective research with immediate production effect.

In this post series I will describe an end-to-end machine learning framework we developed, over Apache Spark, in order to address the different challenges our Data Scientists and Algorithm Engineers face.

Outbrain’s recommendation system machine learning challenge:

Our goal is recommending stories the user is most likely to be interested in, given the user’s interests and the current context.
We need to rank the stories in our inventory by the probability that the user will click to read, and display the top stories to the user.
Our supervision is the past user actions – given a user and a document with a set of features, did the user click or not.

Our data and features:

Outbrain generates a lot of data.
We get over 550 million unique monthly users, generate over 275 billion recommendations monthly and have more than 35 million clicks a day.

The first part to computing quality recommendations, is representing well our key players: The users and the documents.

We extract semantic features from each document that has our widget installed, using an NLP engine. The engine extracts semantic features on some levels of granularity, from high level categories to very granular entities.
For example, on the ‘Westworld’ story below, we extract:

  • High-level categories, such as entertainment.
  • Lower level topics – such as TV or murder.
  • Entities – persons, locations or companies, that the document discusses.

We represent our readers with similar semantic features.

We create an anonymous profile for each reader, based on content they were reading.

Each profile is an aggregation of the semantic features of each document the user read before.

Predictive models:

We use a variety of models, from three main types:

Content based models –

These models assume that there is a semantic connection between the documents the user likes to read.
The model uses the user profile, to find more documents that have similar semantic features to the ones we found out the user likes.
These could be stories within the same categories, from the same sites or covering a specific person or location.

Behavioural models –

Rather than assuming the user will want to keep reading documents on similar topics, it looks for connections between user interests, to other potential subjects that go well together.
For example, it may find that users that showed interest before on retirement investing, will be interested in the future on heart disease articles.

Collaborative models-

The third type, and potentially most powerful and interesting, are collaborative models.

These models use the wisdom of the crowd in order to recommend new content, potentially without the need to semantically understand it.
The basic idea is to find out readers with similar reading patterns; Find out what they like, in addition to the current user; and recommend these items.

Algorithms in this family use algebraic dimensionality reduction methods, such as Matrix Factorization or Factorization Machines, or finding a new, latent representation of the users and items using Deep Learning neural networks.

 

The process of data modeling consists of many common tasks.
To make this process efficient and enable agile research and productization, we have developed a general framework on top of Spark, containing 5 independent components.

Framework overview:

The system’s key components:

  1. Data collection
  2. Feature engineering
  3. Model training
  4. Offline evaluation and simulation
  5. Model deployment

The same system is used for both research and analysis of new algorithms, and also for running production models and updating them on a regular basis.

Next week, in part 2 of this blog post series, we will dive into the data collection flow which is a key ingredient to machine learning flows, and see how data is made more accessible using an automated Spark process.
Part 3 will cover our modeling framework, developed on top of Spark, that allows us to be highly agile with our research tasks, and dynamic as well as robust in pushing our models to production. Stay tuned!